World History II

Bruce A. McMenomy, Ph.D. and Christe A. McMenomy, Ph.D. for Scholars Online
2018-19: Mondays and Wednesdays, 6:00 - 7:30 p.m. Eastern Time

2018

September

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October

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2019

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Chapter 19: Africa and the World
1400 to 1800

6: Mon, Sep 24, 2018

Please read the chapter and take the quiz by midnight on Sun, Sep 23, 2018.
Please also post in the forum for the day a short essay in response to this question:

Certainly the most contested and troubled resource in the period under discussion is population — the people themselves. In some regions enormous numbers of people were taken as slaves and kept locally; in others they were sold to slave traders from other continents for export like any other commodity. What this did to those taken is one important aspect of the phenomenon; what it did to the continent left behind is another. What it did to the places where the slaves arrived is yet a third.

As an issue of human values, we can surely agree that the practice was (and is) morally indefensible. Nevertheless, as historians, we have to look at things from a variety of different aspects. What were some of the economic and social consequences of this large-scale enforced exodus from Africa, and of the influx of an unpaid workforce in the other areas? Is reliance on slave labor economically sustainable ? What are some of its unexpected consequences? What are its long-term social ramifications? You may want to compare, among other things, the instances of slave cultures you have seen in other units previously — especially the Greco-Roman world.